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Weatherall LogoIn “SNAP Selling,” author Jill Konrath explains that “To get your customer to grant you access, it’s imperative that you convey all your information in a series of 20 to 30 second ‘touches’ (via direct mail, email, and phone).”

Inspired by this sentiment, Nosco (a health care packaging and solutions provider based in Gurnee, Ill.), decided to experiment with the concept of conveying the same message in different ways to keep it top of prospects’ minds.

Nosco has tested many types of marketing campaigns and found the most success from a combination of efforts that utilize different mediums. Depending on the featured product or service, the order of the channels may vary, but they all incorporate direct mail, email, and a call or voicemail.

The company also discovered it is not the size of the campaign that matters, but the consistent messaging and laser focus on the right audience. This requires upfront research and an alignment with your sales team to determine the best possible targets.

Ultimately, it is not about one channel working better than another – it is the combination of all channels with consistent messaging. With each campaign, you should consider prospects’ personas, regions and, if possible, their needs. Although direct mail, email, and voicemail are standard (and easy) ways to communicate, don’t be afraid to learn and try new technologies to get your message out as one of your campaign touch points – even if simply to test.

Plan, communicate, test, measure and repeat, integrating both online and offline marketing efforts to determine what works best in combination and in what order for your product or service. Nosco has found a formula that has worked best for it by doing just that. The company has also found that when its communications are personalized, the results are better.

Heather Hill works in Marketing and Communications at Nosco

Consumers definitely know their personal information is more readily available for companies to use than ever before. While this type of data can be used to give consumers more personalized experiences from the businesses they use, they still do not have a lot of insight into the scope of personal data floating around in tracking cookies or in third-party marketing databases. Similarly, they do not have a lot of power to control how this information is used and shared, which now happens in real-time and can be influenced by each user’s specific web activities.

While the marketing and advertising industries successfully deflected major regulations in 2012 through intense lobbying efforts, new regulations in 2013 are highly likely to be passed due to the sheer number of bills and other initiatives currently in the works, along with the need for laws to catch up with the fast pace of innovation in this area:

• Following the release in March 2012 of a two-year
investigation on consumer privacy in the digital age,
the U.S. Federal Trade Commission endorsed
legislative action around data privacy, including
the creation of “do-not-track” mechanisms in web
browsers that help consumers opt-out of online
behavioral tracking and targeting. Efforts by the
industry to self-regulate DNT were stalled at the end of
2012; the consequence may lead to legislative action
on the issue.

• Retiring Democratic Senator from West Virginia, John
D. Rockefeller IV, launched an inquiry into information
brokers like Acxiom, Epsilon and Rapleaf last October to
better understand their practices and determine if they
are handling consumers’ personal data appropriately.

• Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) recently released a draft
bill called “The Application Privacy, Protection, and
Security Act of 2013,” or the APPS Act, targeted at
creating guidelines for data collection, retention and
sharing practices of mobile app developers. With other
initiatives at various stages in the works, expect more
attempts — and some successes — to introduce new
marketing and advertising regulations in 2013.

The Road Map for InfoTrends’ Digital Marketing & Media Trends (DMM) Consulting Service helps companies understand how to harness the power of interconnected media effectively to meet their business objectives. To read the full DMM report, visit http://www.infotrends.com. 

We all have theories on how to best market to Generation Y (also referred to as Millennials). The industry is saturated with articles on how this group of young adults’ (born between 1977 and 1995) spending power will continue to grow. Some marketing leaders believe this group only responds to marketing messages when they come through an electronic device or a social media site.

One thing is certain: Generation Y is completely dependent on their technology, so you would assume this approach must be true. Have you ever witnessed a Gen Y lose their phone? Their world comes to a screeching halt.

Consider these ideas when creating your Gen Y campaigns.

Consider these ideas when creating your Gen Y campaigns.

It is important to understand how we move forward as marketers, given the fact that smartphones have taken the place of just about everything: CDs, calculators, watches, calendars, video game consoles, home phones, TVs, photo albums, trips to the bank, cameras, GPS, pen and paper, alarm clocks, video recorders, newspapers, address books, computers, invitations, social interaction and the list goes on.

Because of this, some brands believe the best, and maybe only, way to market to this generation is through social media or an integrated email campaign. But, I am not so sure this is completely true. With a massive amount of brand messages coming at them in digital formats, how do you break through the different messages they receive and really get their attention?

One idea that may be overlooked is printed mail (and yes, that is mail with stamps). Consider incorporating a direct mail piece into a campaign using multiple touch-points, including a printed piece.

Lamont Swittenberg, managing director at Luminosity Marketing, says, “Sending something by direct mail is a way of breaking through the clutter because they do receive so much communication that comes digitally, and you still can’t replace the personal touch from direct mail.”

With that said, you still need to think beyond a traditional direct mail print piece and understand how to speak to this generation in a way that makes them say,“That’s just cool.”

“The leap for marketers is to recognize the different lens Gen Y applies to reading their mail and adjust the marketing message to make those Gen Y differences a measurable advantage,” says Jason Ryan Dorsey, author of “Y-Size Your Business.” For instance, Dorsey says Millennials prefer pictures and directions to an online video rather than long blocks of text or fancy words.

Although there are many industry leaders teaching us how to “speak Gen Y,” Dorsey is a great resource, being a proud member of this generation himself. You can find more information to help guide you in all marketing touch points to this group of young adults at www.jasondorsey.com .

Heather Hill works in Marketing and Communications at Nosco, a health care packaging and solutions provider based in Gurnee, Ill.