Archives for posts with tag: My Weatherall

Weatherall LogoYes, Direct Mail is still alive and kicking and should have a place in your marketing strategy for 2014. In 2011, businesses spent almost $48 Billion on direct mail marketing. And, it isn’t slowing down with direct mail spending forecast to increase 3.6% through 2014.

Here are 10 tips to consider when designing your next direct mail campaign.

A Good, Clean List
The right mailing list is the key to your campaign’s success. Profiling your current clients and members is a great place to start.

Clear Offer
Be clear about your offer. Direct Mail works best when it is specific.

Be Creative
Get creative with your campaign, but don’t put it before steps 1 and 2. 80% of the success of your campaign will be determined by the list and offer.

Test, Test, Test
Test different offers and designs. Direct Mail is easily tracked. You can segment 10% of your list and experiment with different offers and designs.

Personalize Your Campaign
Personalize the copy and images. Incorporating the prospect’s name into the copy will increase  your response rate. Even better, use relevant information such as gender and ethnicity to version each piece.

Plan for the Majority
Make sure you plan for the majority, not the exception. Obsessing over the gentleman who goes by “Jim” but “James” was on his mailer does not ruin the campaign. Correct it and move on to the next mailing.

Make Responding Easy
Have an online response mechanism. It can be something as simple as an email address, or a more personalized approach using a Personalized URL (PURL).

Pair Your Direct Mail with Other Marketing Channels
Consider pairing your direct mail with other marketing channels, like email. When an email address is available, coordinating the delivery of the email with the mail piece drives up responses.

Repetition
Commit to more than one mailing. Direct Mail has a drip effect that increases the likelihood of a response through repetition.

Contact Weatherall Printing at 800-273-6043
Call us and let’s get started on your next direct mail campaign.

Don’t miss out on a great opportunity to get your prospect’s attention and grow your business.

 

Weatherall LogoIn “SNAP Selling,” author Jill Konrath explains that “To get your customer to grant you access, it’s imperative that you convey all your information in a series of 20 to 30 second ‘touches’ (via direct mail, email, and phone).”

Inspired by this sentiment, Nosco (a health care packaging and solutions provider based in Gurnee, Ill.), decided to experiment with the concept of conveying the same message in different ways to keep it top of prospects’ minds.

Nosco has tested many types of marketing campaigns and found the most success from a combination of efforts that utilize different mediums. Depending on the featured product or service, the order of the channels may vary, but they all incorporate direct mail, email, and a call or voicemail.

The company also discovered it is not the size of the campaign that matters, but the consistent messaging and laser focus on the right audience. This requires upfront research and an alignment with your sales team to determine the best possible targets.

Ultimately, it is not about one channel working better than another – it is the combination of all channels with consistent messaging. With each campaign, you should consider prospects’ personas, regions and, if possible, their needs. Although direct mail, email, and voicemail are standard (and easy) ways to communicate, don’t be afraid to learn and try new technologies to get your message out as one of your campaign touch points – even if simply to test.

Plan, communicate, test, measure and repeat, integrating both online and offline marketing efforts to determine what works best in combination and in what order for your product or service. Nosco has found a formula that has worked best for it by doing just that. The company has also found that when its communications are personalized, the results are better.

Heather Hill works in Marketing and Communications at Nosco

Weatherall LogoLike all things, social media platforms age. As sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram grow and develop, so do their users. Some users who were once frequent and active participants become inactive or leave social media sites. New users enter social media communities and implement their own ethos upon them, forcing initial users out. It is important for marketers to understand the demographic shifts that occur as these social media sites grow over time to ensure that the proper channels are being used to reach target audiences.

A February 2013 Pew Research Center study entitled The Demographics of Social Media Users – 2012 surveyed 1,802 respondents in North America over the age of 18 to uncover the patterns and demographic migrations in social media. Social media sites profiled in this study included Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr. The study found that age had a direct impact on involvement in social media. About 83% of respondents between the ages of 18 and 29 are active with social media, compared to 77% of 30 to 49 year olds, 52% of 50 to 64 year olds and only 32% of those aged 65+.

A 2013 Pew Research study entitled Coming and Going on Facebook discusses how 61% of current users have voluntarily taken a break from using Facebook for several weeks or more. These voluntary breaks have been coined in popular media as “Facebook Fatigue”. During 2013, 38% of 18 to 29 year olds – Facebook’s former core demographic – expect to spend less time on the site or stop using it altogether. Although the reasons for taking a break from Facebook varied, most respondents stated that they were no longer interested, no longer had the time or considered it a waste of time. A smaller number admitted that drama from friends was making the site less appealing. This shift in Facebook use makes it clear that marketers must be ready to accommodate different demographics when using social media as a marketing tool.

Rather than assuming that a particular audience is using a social media site, marketers must research their core demographics before spending large amounts of capital. It is also important to take advantage of the tools that social networks provide to help marketers. For example, Facebook has a feature that enables ads to be pushed to specific age groups. Additionally, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have all taken steps to better cater to their younger users by increasing their video  capabilities. These sites have also developed new tools that marketers can use to reach video-centric audiences. Staying up to date on the demographics of each social networking site, recognizing that these demographics can change over time and leveraging the tools provided by social networks to reach target demographics can prevent marketers from falling victim to demographic shifts or fatigue.

Arianna Valentini is a research analyst with InfoTrends, a worldwide market research and strategic consulting firm for the digital imaging and document solutions industry.

Weatherall LogoAlthough it is estimated that 57% of all businesses are using social media, with approximately 79% having plans to continue to or start using these platforms, many companies are still unsure why or how to use these sites.

Social media tools help a company brand, market and share information. They also allow  your company channels to engage with your target markets in more frequent and less formal ways. Social media sites enable companies to deliver updates on new products, technology and company information without bombarding customers with “too much” or irrelevant data. Your customers (and the world) will have access to this information.

The more engaged a company is on social media sites, the more customers can interact with your brand and identify with your products. For example, customers may comment on blog or Facebook postings. This type of engagement can lead to positive word-of-mouth marketing as prospective customers may see testimonials from happy customers.

Big Myths and Big Benefits
The biggest misconception most business owners have about social media is that there is a “right” and “wrong” way to do it. There is no exact science to social media’s success or which channels work best. Companies have different objectives and different audiences, so the social media strategies aren’t one-size-fits-all. Determine who you want to speak to and how, and what you ultimately want to achieve before establishing your company’s social media presence.

The biggest benefit for companies using social media is that you will engage with companies via the sharing of information rather than trying to “sell” the customer. Target markets will read your content via social media sites or refer to you for free information. As a result, you may have more prospective customers giving you a call.

Stacy Falconer is the Business Development Director for Westfield, Mass based Dion Label Printing.

Douglas Adams had it right. In the late 1970s, “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” introduced the concept of a hand-held device that contained the sum total of all universal knowledge. In 2007, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs re-mixed this idea by talking about a “post-PC” world, a time when the PC went the way of the Dodo bird. Although the fight over terminology made for entertaining media posts, it’s stunniPC_Revolutionng how fast the post-PC vision has come to pass. The Internet is the now source of universal knowledge and smartphones/tablets are the devices nearly everyone is glued to for hours every day. At least on this planet, science fiction has become reality.

Most research now shows that we’ve just now reached the tipping point. According to Gartner, 2013 marks the year that more people globally will access the Internet through mobile devices versus desktop computers. The mobility revolution has changed everything. The resulting transformation in consumer behavior is shaking up whole industries. And, if you believe in the law of exponentials (see Ray Kurzweil’s “The Age of Spiritual Machines”), we’re just getting started. It’s still early days!

So, what?
Well, if you’re in business — any kind of business — you need to care about this deeply. The decisions you make today about how to go mobile, how you think about web development and how to create amazing customer experiences are critical, as they will affect your business in fundamental ways. As technology advances accelerate, businesses need to think about how to drive agility — the ability to respond quickly to unpredictable change. It’s not about features per se; features are transient. The real meaty decisions now involve how you approach web development holistically to include a wide range of touch points, including mobile, TV, kiosks and more. And how to invest in architectures and approaches that drive better agility with lower cost.

“The Post-PC Revolution Is Here —Don’t Panic!” is used with permission from author Mitch Bishop, CMO of MoovWeb. MoovWeb offers products and services that help its customers take advantage of the mobile revolution (http://blog.moovweb.com/2013/02/the-post-pc-revolution-is-here-dont-panic/).